Edit ModuleShow Tags

Erratic gizmos in the C-suite


Published:

My brother and I have a long history of buying "gizmos" for each other for birthdays and Christmas. As an example, last Christmas I bought him a remote control flying helicopter with plastic missiles so he could torment his wife and the cat while sitting on the couch drinking a glass of wine. He bought me a weather kit with remote sensing capability for wind, rain, temperature and barometric pressure. I think that it will tell me what's for dinner, but haven't figured out that feature yet.

Imagine my enthusiasm several weeks ago when I got my "birthday box." I opened it and realized that he had the upper hand this year because it contained a robotic vacuum cleaner. I was mesmerized for several hours, watching it buzz around the room - and it saved me 15 minutes of work! The best part, however, was the cats' reaction! I haven't seen pupils that big since my wife stumbled upon a rattlesnake! They tolerated it when it moved in a straight line, but the seeming erratic and unpredictable movements really shook them up.

I knew the robot had an algorithm built in and was actually using logic, but they hadn't read the user's manual so were clueless.

I often overhear people complain about how stupid senior management is in their company. Sometimes they're right, but too often management might take good strategic action but forget to pass out the user's manual. No one bothered to tell them why they were doing what they were doing. If I hadn't known my new robotic friend was a vacuum cleaner, I would've been puzzled as to its purpose as it zigged and zagged around the room.

People in organizations deserve to frequently hear the whys of your actions. I was in a board meeting the other day, and a topic came up that affected the field organization greatly. One member suggested that the field needed to hear more of the details and the whys of what was going to take place. Another member said, "We told them about it months ago," as if that should be good enough. This "take a pill" management style is far too prevalent.

A communications expert whom I spoke with recently said data showed that CEOs should talk about the vision or strategy of their organization once a week if they wanted people to really understand.

As you zig and zag your way to success, have you given your cats the user's manual? Are you seen as unpredictable, or do your people know where you're going?
{pagebreak:Page 1}

Edit Module
Todd Ordal

Todd Ordal is President of Applied Strategy LLC. Todd helps CEOs achieve better financial results, become more effective leaders and sleep easier at night. He speaks, writes, consults and advises on issues of strategy and leadership. Todd is a former CEO and has led teams as large as 7,000. Follow Todd on Twitter here. You can also find Todd at http://www.appliedstrategy.info,  303-527-0417 or todd@appliedstrategy.info

Get more of our current issue | Subscribe to the magazine | Get our Free e-newsletter

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Archive »Related Articles

How the way you think can sabotage your success

A negative pattern of thinking and decision-making keeps a lot of us complacent, and stuck ― not to mention unfulfilled and less successful than we want to be.

Celebrating 529 plans on National College Savings Day

As the school year begins to end for some and National College Savings Day (5/29) fast approaching, now may be an opportune time to start thinking about college – particularly 529 college savings plans.

How Denver's Tejon Street came back to life

Over the years, Tejon Street went from a thriving streetcar hub with commercial centers and residences to a neglected neighborhood. But in the last decade, with about $100 million invested in the corridor, Tejon has bounced back.
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Thanks for contributing to our community-- please keep your comments in good taste and appropriate for our business professional readers.

Add your comment: