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In sales, you earn what you think you’re worth


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This is a hard attitude to internalize because it puts all of the accountability for our sales career and monetary success on us. It removes all of the external factors that are frequently used to explain why we aren't achieving more than we are. The fact is however, that we are truly earning what we think we are worth. Especially in sales.

Money is a concept. We form a concept in our heads of what we should be making and by extension, what our professional value is. The problem in sales is that when we settle on a value of what we should make, it limits our growth.

So how do we know what our internal money concept is and the value we place on ourselves professionally? If you were to quit or lose your job today, what compensation package would you accept at a new job? The majority of people answer 10 - 15 percent higher or lower than what they currently make.

Typically, outside factors are used to justify this decision. Many times personal spending and lifestyle habits affect what a person feels they are worth and what they need to make. Other times people reason that if one company paid me "x" amount of money, another one should as well. The idea that the person is worth quite a bit more or less rarely enters the thought process.

This phenomenon typically manifests itself in salespeople by reaching a mental plateau. A salesperson who gets a slow start to the year ramps up closing more business than usual, usually thinking that they are better than the results would indicate and adjust the results to reflect that belief. The opposite can be true. A salesperson that closes an unusually large deal and feels they are making more than their ability dictates, begins to coast thus not aggressively going after new opportunities.

Money is a concept. Never limit yourself by assigning a value to what you do. One of the best things about sales is that you usually have some direct control over your income. Don't squander that advantage by setting a dollar amount in your head and finding a way to only meet that number.

A money concept is good if you fall behind and it motivates you to improve to meet a goal. However, don't let it limit you, look to constantly improve and if you find yourself excelling, strive to excel further. You are earning exactly what you think you are worth, give yourself the credit you deserve by upping that personal value assessment.
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Gary Harvey

Gary Harvey is the founder and president of Achievement Dynamics, LLC, a high performance sales training, coaching and development company for sales professionals, managers and business owners. His firm is consistently rated by the Sandler Training as one of the top 10 training centers in the world. He can be reached at 303-741-5200, or gary.harvey@sandler.com.

 

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