Edit ModuleShow Tags

Put your shoulder into it!


Published:

The afternoon of last New Year's Eve was a great ski day. Two friends and I were cycling Resolution Bowl at Copper Mountain. After our fourth or fifth lap, I stopped next to my friend, my legs like jelly, and fell into the trough of the bump I stopped on, landing on my shoulder. It hurt enough to be worrisome, but we finished the day in grand style.

A few days later, post MRI, I knew I needed surgery but wanted to get through the ski season before I fixed it. I had no pain when my hand was in the correct pole position, so it seemed like a good option and I accomplished my objective. Adaptive action versus corrective action. Six months later, I had the shoulder repaired but am still struggling through physical therapy. Because I delayed corrective action, my shoulder froze to the point that I needed help putting on a shirt.

A simple but brilliant way to look at problem solving is through a double-axis chart such as the one below. (The old book "The New Rational Manager" by Kepner and Tregoe is a great resource for this.)

Decision_making_ordal.jpg

My past problem was my shoulder injury. I decided to deal with the effect rather than the cause, taking adaptive action when I probably should've taken corrective action. (I can argue that I had a great ski season, but my wife would tell you that many household chores were put off because of my "bad" shoulder! Sorry, honey, I would like to help, but....)

I see too many problems in companies dealt with through adaptive versus corrective action. Weak players are worked around. Bad strategy is shored up through extra, resource-sucking tactics that don't work well. We increase compensation to deal with turnover when the dysfunctional culture isn't corrected.

The result? Just like my frozen shoulder, the company gets "bound up" so tightly that it cannot function as well as it should. The delay in corrective action usually results in much more painful action at a later date, sometimes major surgery!

All four problem-solving actions can be appropriate, but I see too much adaptive action when problems should be corrected. Step back and look at your systems and processes, and then ask yourself which ones were put in place as adaptive measures when you should've taken corrective action.

{pagebreak:Page 1}

Edit Module
Todd Ordal

Todd Ordal is President of Applied Strategy LLC. Todd helps CEOs achieve better financial results, become more effective leaders and sleep easier at night. He speaks, writes, consults and advises on issues of strategy and leadership. Todd is a former CEO and has led teams as large as 7,000. Follow Todd on Twitter here. You can also find Todd at http://www.appliedstrategy.info,  303-527-0417 or todd@appliedstrategy.info

Get more of our current issue | Subscribe to the magazine | Get our Free e-newsletter

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Archive »Related Articles

What will your company look like in 2025?

I’ll be 60 in 2025. That’s a good marker for many of the early stage companies I’m involved in. “You’ll be the real deal when I’m 60” is a powerful way for me to frame the time commitment it takes to create something substantial out of nothing.

How Oakman Aerospace boosts Colorado's industry standing

Veteran-owned Oakman Aerospace contributes to Colorado’s impressive standing in the industry, providing cutting-edge products and services involved in space systems architectures, spacecraft and satellite design.

To patent or not to patent: That is the question

With a patent protecting your innovative product or service, you have a better chance at capitalizing on your invention. Without a patent, there is nothing stopping well-heeled investors or competitors from moving in.
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Thanks for contributing to our community-- please keep your comments in good taste and appropriate for our business professional readers.

Add your comment: