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GoSpotCheck Depends on Matt Talbot's Core Values

CEO and co-founder of Denver startup earns top honors as top young pro


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MATT TALBOT, 33

CEO + CO-FOUNDER, GOSPOTCHECK, DENVER

A member of the TechStars’ Class of 2010, Talbot has grown GoSpotCheck into a company with backers such as AOL’s Steve Case, more than 100 employees and a client list that includes Under Armor, PepsiCo and Dannon.

Talbot developed core values that would become central to every aspect of GoSpotCheck:

  • Always do great work
  • Communicate effectively
  • Devote yourself to continual learning

Talbot serves as a hands-on adviser for Art Street, a Denver organization that uses the power of creativity to help youth break the cycle of generational poverty in Denver communities by gaining personal and economic stability through education, arts and technology and employment training. In addition to a generous flex-time policy that encourages employees to devote personal time to their community, GoSpotCheck’s team has participated in and supported local initiatives like Denver Startup Week, Art Street, Women Who Code, Outpaws Animal Rescue’s Christmas drive, and the Special Olympics Colorado Plane Pull.

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Lisa Ryckman

Lisa Ryckman is ColoradoBiz's managing editor. Contact her at lryckman@cobizmag.com.

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