Current Issue

September 2014 Issue

Cover Story

Colorado Business Hall of Fame 2012

By Lisa Ryckman

It was a case of great minds thinking alike: The Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce wanted to host an event honoring business leaders, and Junior Achievement wanted to launch a Colorado Business Hall of Fame. So a partnership was born: one that not only pays homage to the brightest business stars from Colorado’s past and present, but also gives JA’s future business leaders shining examples of success – a list that has grown to nearly 150 over the last 23 years. "The history of the Colorado Business Hall of Fame is the alignment of the work JA does with kids and the

Read Full Article

Articles

Colorado cool stuff: Skis, micropacks, snowboards, outerwear

Hot cold-weather gear

By Eric Peterson

MEIER SKIS After making his first pair of skis in 2009, Matt Cudmore today is “trying to keep up with orders – it’s a good problem.” Word of mouth pushed production to about 300 pairs for 2012, a tenfold increase over 2011. The secret is in the materials, including wood from Colorado, says Cudmore, some of it beetlekill pine. “It’s super light,” he explains. “It makes a very poppy and super responsive ski.” It also makes for a good-looking one: “We don’t cover anything up, so you can see the wood. Every piece of wood has its own grain pattern. It’s like a fingerprint.” Cudmore quit his day job and went full-time with Meier in spring 2012, and moved Meier to a new facility south of Glenwood Springs.. . .

Read Full Article^ Back to top

Sports biz: Hey, Buffaloes: Meet big data

By Stewart Schley

Want to make a few million bucks? Get hired as the University of Colorado’s head football coach. Then get fired. That’s the path that has enriched the last three coaches who guided the Buffaloes’ football program. Gary Barnett walked away with $3 million when he was fired in 2005. Dan Hawkins collected $2 million when he was shown the door in 2010. In November, CU paid former coach Jon Embree $1.5 million when it terminated his three-year contract a year early. That’s $6.5 million paid out to three individuals in exchange for NOT coaching the CU football team. Colorado is always looking for growth industries to bring good jobs to our state. By gum, I think we’ve found one. It wouldn’t be so farcical except for two facts. First, colleges fire football coaches with regularity, not just at CU but across the college gridiron kingdom. From 1997. . .

Read Full Article^ Back to top

Business as usual: A twist on Moore’s Law

By Mike Taylor

Most of us are at least vaguely familiar with Moore’s Law, the observation by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore that the number of transistors on integrated circuits doubles roughly every two years. Moore described this trend in a paper he wrote in 1965, and it has pretty much held true since then, driving exponential improvements in digital electronics and changing our lives with ever-faster, more portable and more powerful devices and applications for them. I bring this up because I’ve often wondered if there’s a law applicable to communications technology: that every advancement – cell phones, smart phones, email, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, etc. – reduces the value we place on personal encounters. I doubt it’s provable, but I bet it’s demonstrable. We’re simply more accessible to each other now – instantly reachable in most. . .

Read Full Article^ Back to top

The Economist: Much-needed advice for Congress

By Tucker Hart Adams

Dear members of Congress: Four years ago I wrote a very nice letter to our new president giving him some useful advice on things to do during his term in office. It was such things as lowering the speed limit to 55 and imposing a $5-a-gallon tax on gasoline in order to reduce our dependence on fossil fuel. And putting a $5-a-bottle tax on bottled water so we’d go back to drinking our perfectly satisfactory tap water. And adopting zero-based budgeting. But I never received a response from him, and he appears to have ignored my suggestions. Perhaps his staff never gave the letter to him. After thinking about it, I realize that Congress, not the Executive Office, is where the important decisions are made. So, I want to make some helpful suggestions to you to ensure you preside over a productive four years for our country and its economy. The first thing you need to do is. . .

Read Full Article^ Back to top

Colorado’s 25 Most Powerful Salespeople

Top producers turn prospects into customers by identifying needs – and fulfilling them

By Mike Taylor

Their importance can’t be overstated, yet outside their profession they can be overlooked. Simply put, the people profiled are responsible for delivering their companies’ products and services from warehouse shelves and computer files into the hands of customers. They are the driving force in their companies’ quest for growth and sustainability, and it’s no stretch to say that collectively they play a critical role in the health of the economy. This is our fifth year of recognizing Colorado’s Most Powerful Salespeople. We initiated it back in 2009, in the midst of the Great Recession, as we discussed what a recovery would entail and who would be at the forefront of leading us out of the doldrums. Clearly, we concluded, salespeople would be among those leaders. And they have been. These 25 honorees were selected by ColoradoBiz magazine’s editorial. . .

Read Full Article^ Back to top

2013 Made in Colorado 250

By

Company Category City A&M Aerospace Aerospace Denver AdamWorks Aerospace Centennial Ball Aerospace Aerospace Boulder Intrex Aerospace Aerospace Thornton Lockheed Martin Aerospace Littleton Primus Metals Aerospace Lakewood Zybek Advenced Products Aerospace Boulder Betty Bike Basket Liners Bikes and Accessories Denver Boure Bicycle. . .

Read Full Article^ Back to top

Colorado Business Hall of Fame laureate: Glenn Jones

Founder of online university saw the potential for technology to democratize education

By Maria Martin

For many young adults, the road to earning a college education is fairly bumpy. Put up roadblocks like expense, time and distance, and many give up hope of ever getting to their destination. Consider Glenn Jones a travel guide with one fairly straightforward technique for finding an easier path. Technology. The chairman and CEO of Jones International Ltd., and founder of Jones International University has sculpted his career from the dramatic technological advances our country has seen over the past few decades. "I’ve been surrounded by technology my whole life," Jones says. "Right now, we’re living in an exciting time. You get huge leverage when you put something on the Internet. We can now fuse the communications revolution with education." Jones began. . .

Read Full Article^ Back to top

Colorado Business Hall of Fame laureate: Temple Hoyne Buell

Prolific architect’s impact on Denver still evident in his landmark structures

By Lisa Ryckman

Visionary architect Temple Hoyne Buell changed the way the world shopped. His design for the Cherry Creek Shopping Mall – a collection of connected stores surrounded by parking – built in 1951 on his own land, the 50-acre former city dump – earned him renown as the "Father of the Shopping Mall." "It took him decades, but Sandy Buell took the town dump and created the premier shopping area in the Rocky Mountain region," says Daniel Ritchie, a friend of Buell’s for more than 30 years and current president of the Temple Hoyne Buell Foundation Board of Trustees. "He had a vision, and he never gave up." Debonair, fun-loving and somewhat eccentric, Buell was known for his cape, top hat and handlebar mustache – the source of his nickname, "Sandy,". . .

Read Full Article^ Back to top

Rundles wrap up: The advantage of perspective

By Jeff Rundles

I heard a weather report one Thursday last month that said Friday would be in the 60s, Saturday in the 40s, and Sunday in the 20s. It got me thinking that it would be cool – strange, yes, but still cool – if instead of the weather that same thing just happened to me as a person. On Friday I would have been 60, just like I am, Saturday about 45, and on Sunday I’d spend the day as, say, 25. On Monday when I got to work someone would ask me, "So, how was your weekend?" To which I would reply, "You have no idea. Pretty normal Friday, bought a sports car on Saturday, then Sunday I mastered a smart phone, got 837 new Facebook friends, became gluten-intolerant, and my wife suggested I stay home a couple of days. "How was your weekend?" Ah, if only you could. . .

Read Full Article^ Back to top

Colorado Business Hall of Fame laureate: Don Kortz

He believes in making the world a little better than when you found it

By Maria Martin

Don Kortz’s background, and titles like president, chairman and CEO pop up frequently. The chairman of the board of Cassidy Turley Colorado has been a tireless advocate for the underprivileged and medically underserved through the years. A founder of the Rose Community Foundation, Kortz was its first president and CEO. The long list of boards he’s been on includes Health One, the Mizel Museum and the Denver Zoological Foundation. He’s also served terms as chairman of Colorado Concern and the Children’s Hospital. But titles don’t mean a lot to him. "I don’t believe in taking yourself too seriously," Kortz says. "You have to keep your sense of humor and laugh at yourself." Staying active, both at work and with nonprofit. . .

Read Full Article^ Back to top

Gadgets, gizmos and gear for the New Year

3,000 exhibitors prep for Consumer Electronics Show in Vegas

By Eric Peterson

 It’s a new year and that means new electronics. It also means Vegas, baby, Vegas. The 2013 Consumer Electronics Show rolls into Sin City January 8-11 to showcase the latest and greatest gadgets, gizmos and gear, spanning everything from self-propelled roller skates to brainwave-controlled computers. More than 150,000 attendees will get a taste of the latest and greatest from 3,000 exhibitors. Big trends include wireless wallets, connected cars and cloud-based technologies, but the biggest and broadest trend is the full-throttle innovation that will be on display. Here are a few of this year’s highlights to wet your high-tech whistle at this year’s show. spnKiX You can roll down the sidewalk at 10 miles per hour on spnKiX, a hip hybrid of a Segway and a. . .

Read Full Article^ Back to top

Filling a void for cash-strapped districts

Golden firm helps schools find corporate sponsorships

By Nora Caley

Public schools are struggling with budget cuts, and corporations are looking for new ways to market their brands. Golden-based Education Funding Partners is working to bring the two together. "Companies spend $150 billion a year on advertising," says Mickey Freeman, president and CEO of the two-year-old EFP. "There has got to be a way to redirect some percentage of that in an ethical and moral way into public education." Advertising as a means of fundraising for schools is not a new concept. Local companies have long paid to display banners at sports venues and run small ads in the back pages of theater programs. Freeman says EFP’s efforts are on a much bigger, and more strategic, scale. "Don’t think about us as a signage company," he says. "We give marketers the opportunity to invest district-wide." EFP is a B Corporation, or socially responsible enterprise, that. . .

Read Full Article^ Back to top

Colorado Business Hall of Fame laureate: Ron Montoya

Longtime business owner and community leader cherishes relationships formed along the way

By Maria Martin

Ron Montoya rises early to face every weekday, but unlike many stressed-out businessmen, it’s not with a sense of dread or anxiety. "The first thing I do is join some friends for coffee," says the owner of Innov8 Solutions. "Then I come to work, where everyone around me is a friend." Montoya says he’d even count many of his business partners and clients among his friends. "Relationships are the most important thing in life," says Montoya, 72. "If you have good relationships, good things will come back to you." It seems a simple philosophy for a man who has charge of a fairly complex business. Innov8 Solutions is a supplier of telecommunications and electrical products. He started the company in 2009, after he sold PlasticComm, a manufacturer and. . .

Read Full Article^ Back to top

Tech startup: Panterra Energy LLC

By Eric Peterson

INITIAL LIGHT BULB Then in the roofing business, Mike Ryan had lunch with Tom Myers, a colleague in the construction management, in 2011. "I was looking to do something different," Ryan recalls. "It sounds cliché and silly, but we scribbled on a couple of napkins and came up with a general idea of what to do." That general idea became PanTerra Energy: a geothermal-heating company that operated like a utility, akin to a similar strategy that has been embraced by the solar industry. "Geothermal is the ultimate renewable resource," Ryan says. Underground piping, a.k.a. the loop field, absorbs heat in winter and dissipates it in summer, making for a more efficient and stable heating system. Ryan says geothermal is three to five times more efficient than stand-alone. . .

Read Full Article^ Back to top

Colorado Business Hall of Fame laureates: Rod and Beth Slifer

Vail couple’s savvy helped a mountain town to blossom

By Lisa Ryckman

In the Vail Valley, Rod and Beth Slifer reign as the king and queen of real estate, flip sides of the same business coin. He can sell you a high-country home – then she can do the high-style makeover. The Slifers’ business savvy and commitment to their community have been instrumental in growing Vail from a tiny town to a wildly popular tourist mecca that attracts 1.75 million visitors each year. "Right place, right time," says Rod, whose one-man real estate operation in 1962 was Vail’s first. The couple met on a blind date while Beth was working in the administration of President Jimmy Carter. They continued a long-distance romance between Vail and Washington for five years, and Beth eventually moved to Colorado. Beth arrived with a. . .

Read Full Article^ Back to top

ColoradoBiz TV

Loading the player ...

Featured Video