Edit ModuleShow Tags

Everyone is selling something -- even you!

Like it or not, every business owner is in sales!  Whether you’re selling an idea, delivering a business proposal, conducting a sales presentation or offering a product or service – it’s all selling. Selling is one of the most important skills every business owner needs to develop. If you don’t embrace this fact, it will cost you your business. If you can’t sell with some degree of consistency, it doesn’t matter how great your product or service is it won’t be enough to survive in this economy. Everyone sells something!

Sales people and business owners are struggling like never before because today’s sales climate has changed forever.  In this fiercely competitive economy every meeting, every sales call and every interaction with a potential customer is critical to the survival of that business. Sales are the one area where many people reveal their greatest deficiency. It’s not that they don’t know what to say, it’s that they’re unable to deliver the information in a structure that’s engaging, polished, professional and most importantly persuasive.

Most likely you started your business because you had a particular talent, skill, ability, product or service, not because you wanted to sell. Then you quickly realized that if you didn’t sell, your business wouldn’t be profitable. Promoting and selling is just part of doing business, so why to do so many people choose to ignore this critical step in growing their business?

Call it a belief or a mindset but just a mere mention the word “sales” brings up fear, dread and anxiety to the hearts of many. If business owners want to perform at their optimum level they must change their mindset and way they think about “sales.” How much is your mindset getting in the way of your paycheck?

Trouble is, people don’t believe they’re in sales, so they don’t develop that skill. They refuse to admit they have to sell. Some believe that printing business cards, launching a website and attending a few networking events will be enough to attract new business.

These days smart and savvy business owners are refining and upgrading their skills and service approach to the uniqueness of each customer so that the customer experiences a custom fit, not a one size fits all approach. 

Serious and smart business owners don’t blame the marketing, they don’t blame the competition, they don’t blame the customer and sure they don’t blame the economy.  They all know one thing — they win or lose the sale because of one thing and only one thing, themselves!

To step up your game and your life, you must master the art of selling. You must change your mindset by believing in yourself and believing deeply in the value you’re offering your customer. It’s time for your mindset to stop controlling your paycheck. When you do, you will attract more business, increase sales and be a magnet for success.

Edit Module
Liz Wendling

Liz Wendling is the president of Insight Business Consultants, a nationally recognized business consultant, sales strategist and emotional intelligence coach. Liz is driven by her passion for business and generating results for her clients. Liz understands the challenges that business owners are facing building a business and selling their professional services in today's market.

Liz shows clients how to tap into and use their innate strength, power and confidence to develop highly successful businesses. She teaches them to create effective, dynamic and fluid client conversations that turn interested prospects into invested clients who keep coming back.

Go to: www.lizwendling.com or email Liz@lizwendling.com

Get more of our current issue | Subscribe to the magazine | Get our Free e-newsletter

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Archive »Related Articles

Seven great ways to keep your cash flowing

If there is one lesson that a recession teaches even the most successful businesses, it's that their biggest threat is often not a lack of profit. It's a lack of cash flow. Slow-paying customers are frequently the culprit.

How to make kindness a state of mind

It should be okay to mention that we are struggling with a problem or concern, but instead we bury any chance of connection by saying something like “I’m fine, thanks.”

Why do so many millennials live in their parents' basement?

As a result of watching the value of their parents’ home drop drastically during the 2008-2009 housing bubble, Millennials have grown wary of homeownership.
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Thanks for contributing to our community-- please keep your comments in good taste and appropriate for our business professional readers.

Add your comment: