Edit ModuleShow Tags

GenXYZ: Jeremy Atencio, 39

Attorney/partner, BakerHostetler


Published:

By day, Atencio represents corporations; by night, he advocates for the underdogs.

How did you go into law?

I worked in Gov. Roy Romer’s office and then I went to work for US West, which is now CenturyLink. My job was to lobby before the Federal Communications Commission and different state regulatory commissions. I worked with a team of businesspeople and lawyers to craft our positions. I enjoyed working with lawyers, and a lot of the work was similar to what lawyers do, so I said, why not go for it. For 3 1/2 years, I attended the University of Denver Sturm College of Law at night and worked at Qwest during the day.

What kind of law do you practice?

I advise business clients when they want to buy or sell their company or restructure it, and on compliance obligations. The general nexus is helping companies solve their business needs.

What volunteer work do you do?

I serve on the board for the Community College of Aurora Foundation. We try to raise money for scholarships. I grew up in rural Colorado, in Alamosa, and I benefited from people encouraging me to keep advancing.

The other board is ONE Colorado, which works for equal rights for LGBT people. I’m drawn to these boards because they are the silent heroes for people.

Edit Module
Nora Caley

Nora Caley is a freelance writer specializing in business and food topics.

Get more of our current issue | Subscribe to the magazine | Get our Free e-newsletter

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Archive »Related Articles

Second annual Colorado Tech Tour hits the road

Tech Tour is a storytelling platform to showcase technology innovators and organizations of all sizes as Colorado continues to grow into what is becoming an internationally renowned tech hub.

How to create meetings worth attending

If you’ve ever fallen asleep in a meeting, you’re not alone. Research from Atlassian found that nearly 40 percent of people have nodded off in the conference room. Making a meeting effective and stimulating can be tough, but there are ways.

How Denver restaurants and retail adapt to rising rents

The general rule is simple: A restaurateur’s occupancy cost – rent plus interrelated fees – shouldn’t exceed 10 percent of gross sales. For many local joints, though, it’s become challenging to operate within those parameters.
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Thanks for contributing to our community-- please keep your comments in good taste and appropriate for our business professional readers.

Add your comment: