Edit ModuleShow Tags

Higher interest rates and a stronger economy


Published:

In addition to pulling the economy out of the ditch after the 2008 crisis, low interest rates have helped to fuel the current stock market rally that dates back to early 2009. Prevailing wisdom is that higher rates will choke off the economy and eventually end the rally. The return of volatility in recent weeks to the stock and bond markets is raising fresh questions about the relationship between interest rates and stock prices. If history and logic offer any insights, today's pundits may be wrong about an inevitable connection between the end of quantitative easing and lower stock prices.

The last time the Fed started raising rates was in June of 2004, when the Fed funds rate was at 1 percent. Bit by bit, the Fed raised rates to 5.25 percent, ending that round of tightening at the end of June 2006. During that stretch of two years, the S&P 500 rose over 11 percent and continued to climb for the next year while the Fed held rates steady. In September of 2007 the Fed began easing rates in response to the unfolding banking crisis, eventually reaching .25 percent, where the Fed funds rate has been since December of 2008.

Fast forward to the present. The economy is grinding through a slow recovery.  As the Fed begins to contemplate an end to quantitative easing, good news for the economy in the form of lower unemployment, lower inventories and a sustained rebound in housing are often taken as bad news for the stock market and we sell off. Conversely, indications of weaker than expected GDP growth or a weaker dollar are sometimes cheered by the markets as proof that stimulus is still needed. The last few weeks' price gyrations are showing that the markets may be anticipating a change in policy by the Fed. 

If the recovery is in fact sustainable, the Fed's version of emergency resuscitation will have been effective.  Ultimately, stock prices are driven by the economy and investor perceptions of the current and future business environment. The ability of companies to make profits and pay dividends are proof of a healthy economy. Indeed, earnings on S&P 500 companies have been improving consistently since mid-2009.  In the same vein, modestly higher interest rates are one of several positive consequences of a growing economy. Just ask any saver.

Edit Module
Bob Van Wetter

A graduate of Dartmouth College, Bob is a cofounder and Chief Operating Officer of Northstar, an independent, registered investment advisor. Bob divides his time at Northstar between portfolio management, equity research and spending time with clients. Reach him at bvanwetter@northstarinvest.com.

Get more of our current issue | Subscribe to the magazine | Get our Free e-newsletter

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Archive »Related Articles

Second annual Colorado Tech Tour hits the road

Tech Tour is a storytelling platform to showcase technology innovators and organizations of all sizes as Colorado continues to grow into what is becoming an internationally renowned tech hub.

How to create meetings worth attending

If you’ve ever fallen asleep in a meeting, you’re not alone. Research from Atlassian found that nearly 40 percent of people have nodded off in the conference room. Making a meeting effective and stimulating can be tough, but there are ways.

How Denver restaurants and retail adapt to rising rents

The general rule is simple: A restaurateur’s occupancy cost – rent plus interrelated fees – shouldn’t exceed 10 percent of gross sales. For many local joints, though, it’s become challenging to operate within those parameters.
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Thanks for contributing to our community-- please keep your comments in good taste and appropriate for our business professional readers.

Add your comment: