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How to stay out of voicemail jail


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One issue many salespeople struggle with is voicemail. Prospects hide behind it, screening then simply ignoring your message. Too many voicemail failures, and you end up in what I call "voicemail jail".

There are a number of ways to improve your chances of getting a return call from a voicemail. Here are some tips:

• Don’t pitch your product or service: It broadcasts you’re calling to sell them something.


• Practice on your own voicemail.


• Sound confident.


• Don’t talk too fast.


• Leave your phone number twice.


• Leave a message that sparks their curiosity.


• Keep your message should be short – less than 15 seconds.


• You don’t always have to tell them the name of your company and where you’re calling from.


• Your message can’t sound canned.


• Differentiate yourself from the competition.


• Asking for help works well.


• Give the person a “compelling” reason to prioritize your call.


• Remember that it’s not what you say in a voice message as much as how you say it.


• Tell them when you’ll be available to take their return call. This stops the voicemail tag game.

Try a few of these and you might see some difference in your return calls.
 

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Gary Harvey

Gary Harvey is the founder and president of Achievement Dynamics, LLC, a high performance sales training, coaching and development company for sales professionals, managers and business owners. His firm is consistently rated by the Sandler Training as one of the top 10 training centers in the world. He can be reached at 303-741-5200, or gary.harvey@sandler.com.

 

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