Edit ModuleShow Tags

Leave your emotions in the car


Published:

Do you ever find yourself getting emotionally involved on a sales call?

Quick test: If you ever walked out of a sales meeting and thought “Oh, I should have asked that” or “I should have done that," chances are, you got emotionally involved. Typically, this happens when you’re focused on the outcome (a yes or no), instead of the sales process, assuming you have one. I see a lot of “wing-it” sales processes out there.

I was recently talking to a president of a company, and he mentioned that his salespeople weren’t asking tough questions because they were too afraid to find out the truth. It was easier to add another prospect to their pipeline than risk finding out they were just the mandatory third quote. By the way, these types of prospects are often what I call “suspects.”

If you let your emotions lead the sales call, you can end up:
• Inflating your pipeline with suspects, not quality prospects.
• Cutting price and margins.
• Doing  unpaid consulting.
• Wasting time with suspects who will never buy.
• Putting the pressure on yourself and/or the prospect.
Always be aware of your emotions and the different triggers: size of the account, end of the month, gender, age, experience, title, etc.

Here’s couple of selling rules I teach that might help you when you get emotionally involved:

A prospect who is listening is no prospect at all: This means you’re doing too much talking because you’re emotionally involved in the outcome vs. the process.

No salesperson ever listened themselves out of a sale: In other words, stop getting emotionally involved with the outcome and therefore talking too much. You can’t listen when you’re talking too much.

Edit Module
Gary Harvey

Gary Harvey is the founder and president of Achievement Dynamics, LLC, a high performance sales training, coaching and development company for sales professionals, managers and business owners. His firm is consistently rated by the Sandler Training as one of the top 10 training centers in the world. He can be reached at 303-741-5200, or gary.harvey@sandler.com.

 

Get more of our current issue | Subscribe to the magazine | Get our Free e-newsletter

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Archive »Related Articles

How to avoid the same lame sales questions

Stupid questions anger and waste your prospects' time. Lame questions close doors and opportunities. Lazy questions destroy your trust and credibility. Continuing to spout the same-o-lame-o questions is a recipe for disaster.

Why we need to feed the tech talent pipeline

Colorado currently has more than 16,000 open computing jobs with an average salary of $92,000. So is the gap solely due to a lack in talent, or to the evaluation process when seeking the right talent?

Why Clear Creek County faces tough decisions

Molybdenum ore has been clawed out of the Henderson Mine since 1976. Property taxes from mine operator Freeport-McMoRan are crucial to government operations in Clear Creek County. Those revenues, though, are expected to end soon.
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Thanks for contributing to our community-- please keep your comments in good taste and appropriate for our business professional readers.

Add your comment: