Edit ModuleShow Tags

Spring training for salespeople

The Rockies spent the last month at training camp fine-tuning their skills and practicing the fundamentals. They hit and fielded thousands of baseballs. They spent countless hours in the gym lifting weights and studying film. They are ready for opening day!

It's been said that amateurs practice until they get it right, but professionals practice until they can't get it wrong.

Whether you play a sport at the amateur or professional level is largely determined by your skill level, which correlates to the amount of time spent practicing and preparing. Isn't it true that the same applies in the business world?

Considering we have control over our skills and attitude, it's unfortunate that a lot of salespeople are blaming their company, their products and the tough economy for their lack of success.

Okay, so it's tougher than it used to be, but consider this: If the Yankees played the Rockies this year, would the Rockies just concede the games because the Yankees are the past World Series champs?

No, of course not. The Rockies would do everything in their power to prepare and get ready for some tough games. Are you going to let this tough economy beat you, or are you going do everything in your power to get in better business shape?

The winner of the Rockies/Yankees series would be the team that executes best on that day. Who performs best on any given day has a lot to do with the effort and hard work put in prior to the games. Wouldn't you agree it's no different in the business world?

If you want to excel in the business world, you must put in the time, dedication and hard work before you get in front of your client. After a month of spring training the Rockies are prepared and ready to play in any environment. Is your business ready to play at the highest level, despite the tough environment? I challenge you to consider these questions: How much time have you put in practicing the business fundamentals in your profession? Are you just showing up and expecting to be at the top of your game?

Do you plan your day the night before? Are you as prepared as you should be for that presentation? Are you getting enough sleep so you can perform at peak performance? Have you practiced filling out your paperwork so many times that you can do it without thinking?

Have you practiced and role played how to overcome the common objection(s) you know you will hear during or after your presentation? How well do you know your product knowledge? Are you in "make-a-sale" shape both physically and mentally? Here are 13 ways to get your mind and body in better shape for the 2010 Selling Season.

1. Read for a minimum of 20 minutes a day

2. Attend at least two seminars a year in topics you want to improve in

 3. Put your goals in writing and read them everyday

4. Plan your day the night before

5. Eliminate at least one hour of television per day

 6. Join a networking group

7. Get at least 7 hours of sleep per night

8. Meditate

9. Workout at least 3 times per week

10. Eat healthier

11. Start a mastermind group

12. Get back to the basics

13. Practice, practice, practice!

{pagebreak:Page 1}





Edit Module
David Behr

David Behr's Competitive Edge Seminars have been credited for assisting in the success of companies world-wide, including Fortune 500s. His clientele include Wells Fargo, American Express, Edward Jones, Coldwell Banker, Century 21, ReMax, Farmers Insurance, Pepsi, Bank of America, KB Homes, Del Webb, Hilton, Sheraton and more. He has presented to more than 5,000 audiences nationwide. Learn more about David and Competitive Edge Seminars at www.edgeseminars.com.

Get more of our current issue | Subscribe to the magazine | Get our Free e-newsletter

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Archive »Related Articles

Leading the four-generation workforce

With Millennials’ share of the workforce increasing, understanding their characteristics and personality traits is critical in revising existing and shaping new organizational policies.

Lessons from 20 years of investment management

When I co-founded the investment advisory firm Northstar 20 years ago, the advisory business was truly a cottage industry. There were only three advisors in the Denver-area that had assets of more than $500 million under management.

Executive wheels: Lots of Lexus luxury, but little distinction

These two Lexus sedans are both wonderful vehicles, full of the latest luxuries and technology, and they drive beautifully. So the question is, would you – or should you – buy one?
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Thanks for contributing to our community-- please keep your comments in good taste and appropriate for our business professional readers.

Add your comment: