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Start sweating the small stuff

Many of us have heard that we shouldn't sweat the small stuff. But how do you know what is small and what is not? How do you know if you are sweating the right stuff or the wrong stuff?

That flawed philosophy is breeding poor customer service, underperforming employees, wasted opportunities, big mistakes and many oversights. In business, sweating the small stuff is often exactly the right thing to do because paying attention to the small stuff helps you understand the big stuff.
In this economy everything matters. Everything you do, think and say either moves your business forward or drags your business backwards. As a business owner, you simply cannot afford to overlook this issue. Who takes care of the small stuff in your business? Do you even know?

Closing sales and retaining clients are the lifeblood of any business, especially in tough economic times. After all, it is a lot cheaper to reach out and promote your services to satisfied clients than it is to bring in a whole new crowd. Fostering good relationships, providing value and producing results beyond expectation, it why everything matters.

Small stuff matters and it is what differentiates the outstanding performers from everyone else. Like going the extra mile and the hidden extra step that few people see and even fewer actually take. That stuff separates the average person just barely getting by from the person who really believes in the goal and is dedicated to doing everything it takes in order to achieve it.

Too many people and organizations focus their attention and efforts on getting the big things right, but they ignore the little things that often make a big difference. This blatant disregard for the small stuff leads to negative and damaged reputations, diluted brands and customer loyalty.

Each and every one of us has the power to raise our own bar on complacency and mediocrity and replace it with excellence. Taking charge of our own behaviors and doing what needs to be done and then doing it right the first time!

If you want to achieve true excellence as a business owner, leader or entrepreneur, you have no choice not to pay attention to what matters. Quality of work, attention to detail, uncompromising standards and superior customer care are the hallmarks of excellence.

Do not be fooled into thinking that the small stuff is unimportant. I am not suggesting you obsess so intensely that you lose sight of the ultimate bigger goal. But a little sweat is necessary. Being meticulous and demanding is not a character flaw.

Consumers are starving for good service and what they are hungry for is easy to serve. They want good old fashion customer service, common courtesy and an honest dose of going the extra mile. Why not use the small stuff to your advantage? Seems like many others are ignoring it.
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Liz Wendling

Liz Wendling is the president of Insight Business Consultants, a nationally recognized business consultant, sales strategist and emotional intelligence coach. Liz is driven by her passion for business and generating results for her clients. Liz understands the challenges that business owners are facing building a business and selling their professional services in today's market.

Liz shows clients how to tap into and use their innate strength, power and confidence to develop highly successful businesses. She teaches them to create effective, dynamic and fluid client conversations that turn interested prospects into invested clients who keep coming back.

Go to: www.lizwendling.com or email Liz@lizwendling.com

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