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Top Company 2011 finalist: Epicurean Culinary Group

Epicurean Culinary Group
Years in business: 30
Location: Centennial
CEO: Larry DiPasquale (Watch an interview with President Greg Karl on ColoradoBiz TV.)
Employees: 300+
Company snapshot:
Epicurean Culinary Group is made up of five companies that comprise the complete food and entertainment experience: Epicurean Catering, Epicurean Entertainment, Epicurean at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, Epicurean at Palazzo Verde, and Mangia Bevi Café.
Notable practices: In Epicurean's corporate kitchen, waste output is less than 10 percent. The rest is recycled. Epicurean also uses a composting company, A-1 Organics, that picks up three large containers full of food twice a week. These containers have the combined capacity to compost 525 pounds of food. Rocky Mountain Sustainable picks up recycled kitchen grease from Epicurean's main kitchen every two months from three different 50 gallon drums.
Community involvement: Epicurean is involved in many causes, including: Rocky Mountain Adoption Exchange - for 28 years; Denver Center for the Performing Arts - 30 years; Volunteers of America -18 years; Hospice of Metro Denver - 13 years; Men for the Cure - 12 years; National Sports Center for the Disabled - eight years; Project PAVE - seven years; Denver's Road Home - four years.

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