Edit ModuleShow Tags

Top Company 2011 finalist: Flatiron Construction Corp.

Flatiron Construction Corp.
Years in business: 64
Location: Firestone
CEO: Tom Rademacher (Watch an interview on ColoradoBiz TV.)
Employees: 250
Company snapshot:
With a construction volume of more than $1 billion, Flatiron is one of the leading providers of transportation construction and civil engineering in North America. Its core competencies include major bridge, highway and rail projects. Flatiron's projects have been recognized by some of the construction industry's top owners, associations, organizations and publications the past two decades.
Notable practices: As a testament to the company's safety commitment, Flatiron worked more than 5 million man-hours in 2010 without a single lost-time incident - an achievement nearly unheard of in the heavy civil construction industry. Flatiron is 75 percent below industry average for recordable and lost-time incidents.
Community involvement: Flatiron has partnered with Bridges to Prosperity to provide citizens in isolated Central American communities access to essential health care, education and economic opportunities by building footbridges over impassable rivers. Flatiron also works with Colorado elementary schools in math, engineering and science achievement programs, called "MESA," designed to increase the number of economically disadvantaged and underrepresented students studying engineering, mathematics and science in college.

{pagebreak:Page 1}

Edit Module
the staff of ColoradoBiz

Get more of our current issue | Subscribe to the magazine | Get our Free e-newsletter

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Archive »Related Articles

Why do so many millennials live in their parents' basement?

As a result of watching the value of their parents’ home drop drastically during the 2008-2009 housing bubble, Millennials have grown wary of homeownership.

The woman behind Denver's community workspace movement

Before Ellen Winkler made a name for herself in Denver, shaping work spaces, she started her career on construction sites in New York City.

Thinking of working for a founder? Read this first!

The founder — someone who birthed several companies but never got any of them to profitability — has turned from “The Creative One” (he developed the first product) to “The Critical One,” now more boat anchor than cheerleader.
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Thanks for contributing to our community-- please keep your comments in good taste and appropriate for our business professional readers.

Add your comment: