Edit ModuleShow Tags

Mobile Barbershop Gives Haircuts On the Go

Rock Barbers owner expands his business to make it easier to get a haircut


Published:

Last year, Rock Barbers owner Anthony Full realized he could expand his business by making it easier for customers to get a haircut. “We thought because we see so many people come from the business parks, why not go to where they are?” says Full, who has worked as a barber for 40 years and has owned Rock Barbers for 10. 

He launched BuzzBox Barbers, a mobile barbershop with a fleet of two 150-square-foot trailers that park in office building parking lots in Boulder and Broomfield counties. Each trailer has the space and resources for two barbers to work on two customers at a time. The customers are nearby office workers, who like being able to cross a haircut off their to-do list without driving anywhere.

“What customers tell us is it gives them back their weekend,” Full says. “They get in, they get out, and they don’t have to deal with traffic.” 

Companies in the office parks tell employees that BuzzBox will be in the parking lot on a certain day, and customers reserve a spot online. A haircut costs about $20, usually paid for by the employee.

One early customer was Fresca Foods, which has 500 employees and is located in the Colorado Technology Center (CTC) in Louisville. The HR department asked employees if a haircut by the owner of Rock Barber would be a good offering. “They said Rock Barber is my go-to place,” says Jill Bagley, vice president, human resources and business resources for Fresca Foods. “It was a really nice validation.”

Fresca helped BuzzBox test its online appointment app in the early days, and today BuzzBox visits Fresca every six weeks. “For us as a company, it’s a benefit we can add at no cost,” Bagley says.  

Studio Shed, which makes high-end backyard structures, brought in BuzzBox for a holiday party last year and treated the 25 employees to free haircuts. “We thought it would be unique and cool,” says Mike Koenig, Studio Shed’s founder and general manager.  “It wasn’t mandatory. It was part of the season of giving.”

Koenig is a fan of the mobile concept. Studio Shed already has a mobile dog groomer and mobile bicycle tune-ups. “From an efficiency standpoint, I don’t have 25 employees running out,” he says. “From a scale perspective, it’s pretty scalable. It’s like the airline industry where their assets are mobile.”

Full hopes to grow BuzzBox to more trailers and drive to other parts of the state, and possibly to bring the trailers to events. “We’re creating a way for people to think about haircuts differently,” he says.  

Edit Module
Nora Caley

Nora Caley is a freelance writer specializing in business and food topics.

Get more content like this: Subscribe to the magazine | Sign up for our Free e-newsletter

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Archive »Related Articles

Your Guide to Creating an Impact Plan

Automating your systems for creating impact helps eliminate the daily tasks you have, which allows you to avoid feeling like you always come up short on how you are impacting the world around you.

Want to get 2020 goals back on track? Think like a consultant

As consultants, we have one goal: Ensuring transformation happens successfully. Whether that’s driving incremental progress or grabbing a drink with a co-worker to talk about our hurdles, the strategies below are key consulting tips and tricks that drive success at work and in our personal lives.

How you can buy local during COVID-19

Food and groceries feel more important than ever during the COVID-19 situation. In response, Colorado Commissioner of Agriculture Kate Greenberg reminds every Colorado resident how local food is adding extra value to our lives and, of course, to the grocery shelves.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module


 

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleShow Tags