Golf is changing with the times

What to expect from Denver-area golf courses during COVID-19
Wellshire Golf Course
Wellshire Golf Course is one of Denver Golf's eight courses located throughout the Denver Metro area. Photo courtesy of Denver Golf.

There are a lot of fantastic things about springtime in Colorado – abundant sunshine, blooming flowers, gorgeous hikes in the mountains and of course, golf. As we all know, this year has been like no other. COVID-19 has touched and changed almost every single aspect of our lives and the sport of golf was not spared. However, unlike a lot of other sports and recreation activities, golf is naturally a social distanced activity, so let those tee shots fly.

In an effort to stay compliant with both city and state health mandates surrounding COVID-19, golf may look a little different than rounds played before March 18. The new social distancing guidelines are designed to minimize the spread of the infectious virus and protect the guests and employees of the facility.

Most golf course facilities have closed the doors to their golf shops to reduce the amount of traffic in a regularly busy space. By having guests either pre-pay or call in to take care of their green fees, they avoid any face-to-face contact with guests and are reducing potential touchpoints during a typical transaction at the counter.  Most courses are also requiring guests and staff to wear face coverings in and around the clubhouse.

Some local golf courses are offering an opportunity to either walk during your round or rent a golf cart. At courses that are allowing you to ride, only single riders are allowed in order to maintain the physical distancing needed to remain safe.  Several precautions have been put into place to ensure that a golf cart is safe and free of virus-spreading germs. The carts and all their touchpoints are thoroughly washed and wiped down with a disinfecting solution before and after every use.

Once the round begins, familiar tools like rakes, water stations, ball washers, sand bottles and pin flags have all either been removed or modified to reduce the number of touchpoints a guest may encounter. The virus can survive on such surfaces for an extended period, so by minimizing these surfaces, golf courses are reducing the likelihood of spreading the virus.

While many precautions have been deployed by the facility, and this will vary from course to course, it is ultimately up to the guest to protect their own health as well as those around them. Guests are encouraged to wash their hands often and are asked to wear face coverings when they visit the restrooms or restaurant.  If you are sick or experiencing symptoms, please stay home.

If we as golfers and staff of the course can adhere to the recommendations of the public health orders, then we will have an opportunity to continue to play and work around the game we love.

(This sponsored content was provided by Denver Golf.)

Categories: COVID-19, Industry Trends, Sponsored Content, Travel, Tourism & Recreation