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Can you be a deep thinker…


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 I am completely wiped out. It's noon on Saturday in Colorado. I just had five days in a row of 18-hour days. I started the week in San Francisco and flew back home on Friday night from New York (with a red eye in between). It was awesome, but exhausting.

In addition to all the work, there was plenty of ambient emotion last week including some around mortality (Steve Jobs died and a close friend's father died). In between everything, I spent a had a lot of meals with people I haven't seen in a while, or whom I'm really close to. On top of that, there were hundreds of emails a day, plenty of telephone calls, and lots of random stuff to deal with.

And plenty of running, coming off a weekend of back to back long runs (14 miles on Saturday, 16 miles on Sunday). And the Imperial March rang on my phone several times a day when Amy called, which always gave me a nice positive emotional charge.

I slept 12 hours last night. Amy made me a great breakfast and I've spent an hour catching up on unread emails from yesterday. But I'm just fried. And I'm going to crawl back into bed for a nap, go to a movie this afternoon, and then have a quiet dinner with Amy somewhere.

When I reflect on last week, I consciously spent very little time thinking deeply about anything. My runs were mostly mental garbage collection times, I slept on the airplanes, and I was in the moment the rest of the time dealing with the present. Sure, some of the discussions were longer term, strategic type things, but all the thought processes were surface level vs. deep discovery.

I'm working on a book called Entrepreneurial Communities. It'll be done by the end of the year. I'll likely self-publish this one as I don't perceive any benefit to having a publisher now that I've done two books the traditional way. I also don't want to introduce an additional six months into the writing to publishing cycle. I spent exactly zero time working on the book last week, although I had no expectation that I would.

But when I think about what I learned this week, and what I talked about, plenty of it pertained to the book. While I consciously spent very little time thinking about entrepreneurial communities, I unconsciously spent a lot of time thinking about it. And while my surface level discussions about longer term things didn't impress me as deep thinking, by talking out loud about complicated issues I continued to modify the way I talk and think about them.

This is a style of mine. While I don't "think out loud" like some do, I "refine my thought process" by talking about - and doing - things around the topics that I think deeply about. The development, creation and sustaining of entrepreneurial communities is one of those topics that I've been doing a lot of thinking about lately, and anyone who knows what I spent my time on knows that many of the things I work on pertain directly to the activities around these, rather than just the thoughts around these.

By being insanely busy in areas that I think (and care) deeply about, I'm actually engaged in an "active deep thinking" rather than a passive deep thinking. It's easy to end a week like the last one (which is a pretty typical week for me) with the reaction of "wow - that was intense and insane, but I didn't really have any time to think about what I wanted to think about." That's wrong - I spent the entire week actively thinking, which makes my ability to deeply think about topics I care about even more powerful and effective.

I'm sure there is some philosophy, or psychology, about how a human links passive and active around the formation of thoughts, ideas, and theories. I'm not going to think deeply about that, especially since it's meta in the context of this post, but I'm certain that the answer the my question that I posed in the title is a resounding yes when you combine active and passive thinking.
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Brad Feld

Brad has been an early stage investor and entrepreneur for more than 20 years. Prior to co-founding the Boulder-based Foundry Group, he co-founded Mobius Venture Capital and Intensity Ventures, a company that helped launch and operate software companies. Brad is a nationally recognized speaker on the topics of venture capital investing and entrepreneurship and writes widely read and well respected blogs at www.feld.com and www.askthevc.com. He holds bachelor's and master's of science degrees from from MIT. Contact him at brad@feld.com

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