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30 years strong: Colorado Business Committee for the Arts celebrates creativity

Building a bridge from local business to artistic community


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With 30 years of experience in Denver’s arts community, the Colorado Business Committee for the Arts is lighting up local businesses, individuals and organizations that bring special support to the arts.

“We try to investigate all companies that have any kind of arts focus,” says Diane L. Stahl, membership and development manager at CBCA. “Whether that is marketing and branding efforts or employee initiatives, to where they have their philanthropic dollars. We like to tell the stories of how they have contributed to overall economic drivers. It all connects together.”

CBCA is holding its annual Business for the Arts Awards luncheon March 15 to recognize and honor major efforts made to foster and broaden arts and culture.

The organization is helping promote and facilitate Noble Energy Colorado’s commitment to youth education, health and wellness. Noble is a finalist for the Philanthropy Award, thanks to its partnership with the Denver Center for Performing Arts, to advance the “STEM to STEAM” movement locally, adding an arts focus to science, technology, engineering and math education programs in K-12 classrooms across the state.

In a stroke of genius, Sage Hospitality implemented an arts initiative in all its hotels, helping earn its place as a finalist for CBCA’s Impact Award. Each Sage hotel is outfitted with specially curated works of art – often from local artists – reflecting the distinctive style of each hotel brand. The Crawford Hotel in LoDo hosts works from Jake Weidmann, a Denver-based artist and one of 14 Master Penmen in the world.

At local worker’s compensation insurance company Pinnacol, investments in artistic enterprise are built into the culture. Some employees are enrolled in CBCA’s Leadership Arts program, learning how to assist arts organizations and nonprofits by serving in leadership roles or on boards of directors.

“We believe arts are integral to a thriving economy,” says Edie Sonn, vice president of communications and public affairs at Pinnacol. “CBCA’s analysis of the economic impact of the arts shows that.”

Pinnacol didn’t make the awards finalist list this year, but remains a leader in creative stimulation in the workplace. The company holds employee art exhibitions – judged by professional artists – that have helped form strong bonds between workers and supported non-work interests. 


CBCA Business for the Arts Award finalists

CREATE AWARD

EY NEXT WAVE LEADERSHIP AWARD

IMPACT AWARD

JOHN MADDEN JR. LEADERSHIP AWARD

PHILANTHROPY AWARD

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ColoradoBiz staff

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