Edit ModuleShow Tags

GenXYZ: Shane Gring, 26

CEO, BOULD LLC


Published:

Gring turned his frustration while trying to find a job in architecture into BOULD, which educates professionals about building green homes.

What inspired you to start BOULD?

After I graduated from Miami University in Ohio, I really struggled to find work in architecture. I was with AmeriCorps for a year, and I ended up in Colorado, where I went to work for Habitat
for Humanity. I saw an opportunity not only to build better homes for families, but to educate people. I came up with this program that would teach professionals about green building while helping nonprofits.

How do you combine education and building?

We have community and professional programs so that builders can earn LEED credits. Our newest product is the Green Building Hackathon. We invite community groups, students, volunteers, builders, corporate sponsors and U.S. Green Building Council representatives for a day-long event. The community group works on a new building, such as a shelter or a new facility. The builders get LEED education. The volunteers learn about green building.

What’s next for you?

I thought I was going to spend my career sitting in front of a computer, and I’m glad it didn’t turn out that way. I have wanted to be an architect since I was 6 or 7, but it’s a very long process with graduate school and then a five-year apprenticeship. With BOULD I’m reaching out to schools, professionals, and educating people and helping them build the best possible buildings.

Edit Module
Nora Caley

Nora Caley is a freelance writer specializing in business and food topics.

Get more of our current issue | Subscribe to the magazine | Get our Free e-newsletter

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Archive »Related Articles

The CTA brings tech-savvy Colorado to Washington

The Colorado Technology Association plans to meet with leaders in technology and innovation during a three-day trip to Washington, D.C. that will spotlight actionable business goals, initiatives and insights.

What kind of experiences are your customers having?

I was working with a San Francisco Bay Area transportation company. The story begins when I entered their lobby for our first meeting. Behind the receptionist desk were these three-foot-tall letters, proudly displayed, impossible to miss: ETDBW.

Down with managers -- up with success!

I'm aware of 100 or so companies that don't have managers (and there are easily a few thousand that I'm not aware of), and I've never heard them say they can't find good people.
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Thanks for contributing to our community-- please keep your comments in good taste and appropriate for our business professional readers.

Add your comment: