Edit ModuleShow Tags

The power of internal branding

Have you ever walked into a company's office or production facility for the first time and immediately noticed a refreshing level of enthusiasm and commitment from the people who work there? There is something positive animating the whole environment. What you're sensing is the employees' collective loyalty to the company and its brand.

The effort to consciously cultivate this experience is known among communications professionals as internal branding-a concept predicated on the belief that your employees are just as important an audience as your customers and prospects.

As with all branding efforts, authenticity is key. If a company attempts to instill excitement around brand attributes and virtues that it really doesn't possess, it only generates cynicism among employees. Mission statement posters that claim one thing while management attitudes and behaviors say another end up breeding low-level negativity-a passive aggressive attitude that ultimately seeps out into interactions with customers. It's like a low-grade fever that passes from employees to customers, and never quite gets cured.

On the other hand, brand loyalty is equally contagious. Customers can't help but be swept up in the excitement when a company is living out the highest virtues of its brand every day. To create this positive flywheel effect within a business, internal branding must be reinforced 1) from the inside out; 2) from the top down; and 3) from the bottom up.

From the Inside Out

"Our internal branding is really all about our company's culture. It grows from the inside out," says my colleague Steve Gade, vice president of sales and marketing at Duncan Aviation. "We set expectations from day one with all new employees regarding our brand values, beginning with an orientation that includes a dialogue with our chairman, president or the most senior leader at each hiring location."

Another way that Duncan Aviation reinforces its brand is by sharing companywide each Friday how various customers have mentioned the positive experiences they've had with specific employees. "Our people thrive on this positive feedback," Gade says. "It encourages us all to be our best."

From the Top Down

Internal branding goes far beyond what the marketing department can deliver. Unless an organization's top leadership is actively and consciously cultivating the brand within the organization, the effort will never reach its full potential.

For business leaders to assure that such internal branding is given proper attention, it is good to set aside some time annually to take a pulse on the company culture, and to talk to customers about what they are experiencing. The late Steve Jobs was known for periodically manning the customer service phones at Apple just so he could hear this kind of first-hand feedback. His commitment to delivering the Apple brand experience across all customer touch-points is what has made the company so fanatically beloved and so immensely profitable.

When I work with company leaders on their branding or re-branding efforts, one of the exercises involves asking questions such as:

1. What is the first word that should come to mind when people hear your company mentioned?

2. What are the core brand values to which you are willing to hold fast, even if it means losing business?

3. What is the greatest compliment your fiercest competitor would have to pay your organization?

4. What is the most frequent compliment you hear from your customers?

5. What behaviors are most rewarded in your organization?

6. Would all your employees give the same answers to the questions above?

Simple questions like these provide much-needed clarity on the path to developing a coherent, authentic and relevant brand. It then remains to give creative expression to it, both within and outside the company.

From the Bottom Up

There's a world of difference between employees giving passive assent to a company's brand virtues and actively finding ways to reinforce them in their daily lives. The sure sign of a company's successful internal branding effort is overhearing employees talking about the brand virtues in conversations with each other and with customers.

And because you'll never find employees more receptive to imbibing the brand than when they are first hired, orientation is a crucial time to be highly intentional about internal branding. Rather than viewing this opportunity as some sort of passive corporate "indoctrination" process, new hires should be encouraged to apply the brand in their everyday work, and even be empowered to challenge company policies, procedures and experiences that are inconsistent with the brand.

Keeping Things Simple

As with all marketing efforts, simplicity is crucial to success with internal branding. A complex mission statement will never fire the hearts and imaginations of employees. They won't be able to remember it, let alone apply it to their daily lives. But a clear, simple brand is a clarion call that enables employees to reinforce it with customers every day.

For example, Ritz-Carlton's legendary mantra, ladies and gentlemen serving ladies and gentlemen is a simple but elegant encapsulation of the hotel's internal brand. Because it is so simple, it requires the conscious, intelligent application by all employees. It doesn't tell people what to do. It tells them who they are as employees of the Ritz-Carlton. You only need to stay at a Ritz property once to realize that this internal branding effort is working.

Perhaps the most powerful tactic in this area is to encourage employees to treat each other like customers. Such internal reinforcement of the brand among coworkers will result in a greater consistency of the brand experience for customers.

Visual Branding

We live in a highly visual culture where sophisticated graphics infuse everything from the television we watch to the packaged products we buy. So as employees daily come into contact with their company's visual brand elements-logos, color schemes, iconic images-these visual cues can subconsciously communicate staying power, strength, and structure as opposed to chaos and disorder. It's like a football team that is continuously reminded of its identity by its colors, logo, mascot and other accoutrements.

It takes time, attention and accountability for a busy company to maintain this level of visual brand consistency; but it will enable the organization to communicate to its employees and customers that the brand really matters. Thus any employees who have a role in producing communications should work out of a brand standards guide that specifies correct logo usage, approved color scheme, typeface, etc.

That way, every communication effort produced for both internal and external audiences reflects a unified look and feel. (There are few things that suggest chaos and disorder more than having multiple versions of a logo used in company communications.) To employees and customers alike, visual brand consistency conveys the precision and discipline that stand behind the company's services.

Ambassadors of an Embassy

In most industries, strict adherence to checklists, protocols and standards of professionalism are indispensable. The same is true of internal branding. Ultimately, the goal of internal branding is to make every employee a brand ambassador-someone who is loyal to the brand, who defends and promotes it to those outside the organization, and whose day-to-day decisions are defined by the freedom and empowerment to apply the brand.

As Steve Gade at Duncan Aviation says, "Our customers tell us that we have something different going on here. That's how we know we are doing things right."
{pagebreak:Page 1}

Edit Module
David Heitman

David Heitman is the president of The Creative Alliance, an award-winning branding and public relations in Lafayette, Colorado. He can be contacted at david@thecreativealliance.com

Get more of our current issue | Subscribe to the magazine | Get our Free e-newsletter

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Archive »Related Articles

Top nine ways to make the most of your press coverage

Both start-ups and well-established business seek press coverage for their products and services, and a feature story in a well-respected publication can be much more effective in generating sales than traditional forms of advertising.

RII Sports Technology uses data to give football coaches an edge

Tom Woods doubled down and started a second business built off the model of his first, but the new idea was rooted in football – the perfect elixir for a die-hard sports fan like Woods.

Top seven tips to fuel your fervor

There are days when you feel like you are running on empty. Your fuel for your pursuit seems to be gone. We've all been there. How to nurture passion? Try these tips.
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Thanks for contributing to our community-- please keep your comments in good taste and appropriate for our business professional readers.

Add your comment: